Question: How Do We Celebrate Waitangi Day?

How do you celebrate Waitangi Day?

How to celebrate Waitangi DayGo to a Waitangi Day ceremony or event.Start tracing your whakapapa or family history.Take the family along to your local library or museum to find out more about New Zealand’s history.Read the Treaty of Waitangi and our comprehensive reference guide to the Treaty.Explore New Zealand’s history.More items….

How did Waitangi get its name?

The Treaty in brief The Treaty of Waitangi is New Zealand’s founding document. It takes its name from the place in the Bay of Islands where it was first signed, on 6 February 1840. The Treaty is an agreement, in Māori and English, that was made between the British Crown and about 540 Māori rangatira (chiefs).

What is written in the Treaty of Waitangi?

The text of the treaty includes a preamble and three articles. It is bilingual, with the Māori text inaccurately translated from the English. Article one of the Māori text grants governance rights to the Crown while the English text cedes “all rights and powers of sovereignty” to the Crown.

Is Waitangi Day a statutory holiday?

Waitangi Day is a statutory public holiday in New Zealand.

What is traditional New Zealand food?

While you’re in New Zealand, seek out a couple of the following quintessential Kiwi foods.Seafood. With more than 14,000 kilometres of coastline, New Zealand is home to some amazing seafood. … Roast lamb. … Māori hāngī … Fish and chips. … Cheese and wine. … Barbeque. … New Zealand desserts. … New Zealand lollies (sweets and candies)

Is food expensive in New Zealand?

While meal prices in New Zealand can vary, the average cost of food in New Zealand is NZ$43 per day. Based on the spending habits of previous travelers, when dining out an average meal in New Zealand should cost around NZ$17 per person. Breakfast prices are usually a little cheaper than lunch or dinner.

How do you spell Waitangi?

Waitangi is a locality in the Bay of Islands on the North Island of New Zealand. It is close to the town of Paihia, 60 kilometres north of Whangarei. The name means weeping waters in Māori.

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi important to everyone living in New Zealand today?

Why the Treaty is important The Treaty governs the relationship between Māori – the tangata whenua (indigenous people) – and everyone else, and ensures the rights of both Māori and Pakeha (non-Māori) are protected.

What does Waitangi mean?

There are several possible meanings for ‘Waitangi’ – it literally translates as ‘noisy or weeping water. ‘ Reed’s Place Names of New Zealand notes that the literal meaning of the Waitangi in the Bay of Islands may refer to the noise of Haruru Falls at the mouth of the Waitangi River.

What day do we get off for Waitangi Day?

If Waitangi Day or Anzac day are on a Saturday or Sunday and you do not normally work, you get the following Monday as a paid public holiday.

What did the Treaty of Waitangi promise?

The Treaty promised to protect Māori culture and to enable Māori to continue to live in New Zealand as Māori. At the same time, the Treaty gave the Crown the right to govern New Zealand and to represent the interests of all New Zealanders.

Is Anzac Day 2020 a long weekend?

There is no ANZAC Day ‘long weekend’ in NSW, Victoria, Northern Territory, Queensland, Tasmania and South Australia for 2020. As mentioned, ANZAC Day in 2020 will fall on a Saturday. … It does not provide for any automatic substitution or additional arrangements,” a NSW Government spokesperson told Lifehacker Australia.

What are the 3 principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The three “P’s”, as they are often referred to, are the principles of partnership, participation and protection. These underpin the relationship between the Government and Māori under the Treaty of Waitangi. These principles are derived from the underlying tenets of the Treaty.

Which Chiefs did not sign the Treaty of Waitangi?

Tāraia Ngākuti, a chief of Ngāti Tamaterā in the Coromandel, was one of many notable chiefs who refused to sign the Treaty of Waitangi. Tāraia was a famous warrior and may have felt that signing would be beneath him.

What is the Treaty of Waitangi Day?

6 FebruaryEvery year on 6 February, New Zealand marks the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840. In that year, representatives of the British Crown and over 500 Māori chiefs signed what is often considered to be New Zealand’s founding document.

What do they eat on Waitangi Day?

Sausage Sizzle Cooking up a feast this Waitangi weekend? It doesn’t get much easier than sausages, so throw some on the barbecue and call it a day! Just remember—it’s not truly Kiwi unless it’s wrapped in bread.

Why is Waitangi Day so important?

Waitangi Day (Māori: Te Rā o Waitangi), the national day of New Zealand, marks the anniversary of the initial signing – on 6 February 1840 – of the Treaty of Waitangi, which is regarded as the founding document of the nation. … Ceremonies take place at Waitangi and elsewhere to commemorate the signing of the treaty.

What Waitangi Day means to me?

Waitangi Day means to me, it kind of brings everyone together, Maori and non-Maori, and we get to share our [Maori] culture. … It’s a day that Maori get to celebrate their culture . . . it’s a time we lose our negative names and get to shine on the positive bits of our culture.

What the Treaty of Waitangi means to me?

The Treaty of Waitangi is the founding document of our country. Maori agreed: to let other people live in their country; and. to let the British make rules about behaviour and see that everyone obeys them.

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi called the Treaty of Waitangi?

The Treaty of Waitangi is the founding document of New Zealand. It is an agreement entered into by representatives of the Crown and of Māori iwi (tribes) and hapū (sub-tribes). It is named after the place in the Bay of Islands where the Treaty was first signed, on 6 February 1840.

Do I get paid for Waitangi Day?

In 2019, Waitangi Day falls on Wednesday 6 February. … Moreover, businesses owners that require work on Waitangi Day, must pay employees at least ‘time and a half’ of their regular pay for the time worked.