Quick Answer: Does Flu Make Your Legs Ache?

Why do my legs hurt with flu?

At the emergency room, doctors diagnosed Martin with the flu, and said his leg pain was due to “compartment syndrome,” Diane McGowan said.

“Because the muscle has no room between the skin and the bone, it causes pressure on the arteries and veins with your bone, and can eventually cut off the circulation,” she said..

Why do your legs ache when you are sick?

Your immune system, not the virus, causes muscle aches and joint pain. During the immune response, white blood cells produce glycoproteins called interleukins. These interleukins cause the symptoms associated with colds, flu, and other bacterial or viral infections.

How long does your body ache with the flu?

Symptoms usually appear from one to four days after exposure to the virus, and they last five to seven days. For people who’ve had a flu shot, the symptoms may last a shorter amount of time, or be less severe. For other people, the symptoms may last longer. Even when symptoms resolve, you may continue to feel fatigued.

Can the flu cause you not to walk?

Imagine suffering from something as common as flu and being paralysed suddenly, without being able to walk, move your hands or legs or even swallow food. Although our immune system creates antibodies to fight the flu virus, sometimes these antibodies can also attack the myelin or protective sheath around nerves.

Why do my legs ache?

Most leg pain results from wear and tear, overuse, or injuries in joints or bones or in muscles, ligaments, tendons or other soft tissues. Some types of leg pain can be traced to problems in your lower spine. Leg pain can also be caused by blood clots, varicose veins or poor circulation.

What helps leg pain after viral fever?

Common treatment methods include:taking over-the-counter fever reducers, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen, to reduce a fever and its symptoms.resting as much as possible.drinking plenty of fluids to stay hydrated and replenish fluids lost while sweating.More items…•

Can cold make your legs ache?

Consequently, the legs, knees, arms, shoulders and other joints have less blood. This, in turn, makes the blood vessels at the joints constrict. The reduced flow of blood makes those areas stiffer and colder, which can result in pain and discomfort.

Can flu cause weakness in legs?

It is well-known that muscle aches and weakness are prominent symptoms of influenza infection. Our study in an animal model found that influenza infection leads to an increase in the expression of muscle-degrading genes and a decrease in expression of muscle-building genes in skeletal muscles in the legs.

Can a virus make your legs ache?

The Flu. When a flu virus hits, it brings on fever and congestion, and it can make your muscles ache, especially in your back, legs, and arms. It usually gets better on its own in a week or so, but call your doctor if it doesn’t.

What helps with body aches from the flu?

Treat aches and fever. That’s because your body has turned up the heat to fight off the flu virus. Treat it and the aches that come with it with over-the-counter medications like acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or naproxen. Ask your doctor which is right for you. Never give aspirin to anyone younger than 19.

Why does your body ache with the flu?

The flu, the common cold, and other viral or bacterial infections can cause body aches. When such infections occur, the immune system sends white blood cells to fight off the infection. This can result in inflammation, which can leave the muscles in the body feeling achy and stiff.

What do flu aches feel like?

One of the most distinct symptoms of the flu (influenza) is painful body aches. 1 For most people, their muscles feel so sore and achy it hurts to move. Additionally, body aches can leave you feeling weak, fatigued, and extremely exhausted. Fortunately, they can be treated and managed successfully.

Can the flu cause leg pain?

Muscle wasting (atrophy) is often prominent. Up to one-half of these patients have trouble swallowing. Infectious myositis. When infectious myositis is caused by the flu, symptoms include not only muscle aches and muscle weakness, but also high fever, chills, sore throat, cough, fatigue and runny nose.